American Sign Language: A New Club

American Sign Language is being introduced at school, including LHS.

American Sign Language has been around for over two centuries, 360 million people around the globe are hearing impaired. ASL has been helping the deaf around the globe communicate with the world around them. Not only is it benefiting the deaf, but more and more are becoming interested in it by joining the ASL club. This club was started by senior Rebecca Wright who was inspired by her science teacher, Mr. Brewer.

Photo by Erynn Sly

“My teacher, Ryan Brewer, would teach us ASL every day before the beginning of class and that just inspired me to learn it on my own and all of that has moved me to start a club my sophomore year,” senior Rebecca Wright said.

Brewer teaches his class a few phrases of sign language to do with the lesson, like different terms that was being taught that day to get his students’ brain going.

“I started my class with sign language of the day six or seven years ago,” Brewer said. “It was a fun way to have a routine to get everyone thinking about what we’re going to do and what we’re going to talk about.”

Studying ASL promotes better awareness of and sensitivity to the deaf and hard of hearing community.

“Learning ASL at school provides a skill for students that helps in everyday life,” freshman Ben Trammell said. “If you encounter a hearing impared person in you job, or school and if you can’t help them then that’s a problem.”

An estimated 600,000 people in Missouri are deaf or hard of hearing, which is around one-tenth of the population of Missouri.”

“I anticipate that we’re going to be learning certain phrases, like colors, some grammar rules any subject really.” Wright explains, “it’s just a great way to meet new people and to learn more things about yourself and others and just the language in general.”

An estimated 600,000 people in Missouri are deaf or hard of hearing, which is around one-tenth of the population of Missouri.

“It’s a way to apply yourself. There’s a whole deaf community that communicates through ASL. How they communicate can be an eye-opener for some people,” Brewer said.

Now students can join the ASL club by looking at the information in the counselor’s office or contacting Rebecca Wright or Ryan Brewer.